Breast Cancer Decision App

How might we give breast cancer patients the right education at the right time to allow them to make treatment decisions that are best for them

  Prototype created by Breast Cancer clinical team during a design bootcamp weekend

Prototype created by Breast Cancer clinical team during a design bootcamp weekend

WORK AT
Mayo Clinic - Center for Innovation

TIMELINE
12 months

ROLE
Lead Service Designer / Design researcher
UX/UI Designer
Product Owner / Vendor relations
Managed Design Intern

 

ACTIVITIES
Patient / Family / Care Team interviews
Patient / Provider observations
Workshop facilitation
Wireframing
Site mapping
Synthesis presentation
Secondary research / literature review

OUTCOME
iPad application was created and iPads were given to 500 breast cancer patients for a research study. The study was across main Mayo Clinic sites and two Mayo Clinic Health Systems.


I was the service designer on a three person team of a project manager and clinical coordinator. We provided funding and support to people within Mayo who had innovative ideas. The head of the breast cancer department had a digital educational tool used in appointments and wanted to make it a patient decision tool. Our team started first with a project blueprint workshop to understand the team's purpose and goals, any risks their project faced and next step activities. 


Research phase and patient quotes

  Breast Cancer survivor map of her experience

Breast Cancer survivor map of her experience

  Breast Cancer survivor map of her experience

Breast Cancer survivor map of her experience


KEY INSIGHTS

  1. Patients are anxious and overwhelmed, information has to be staged: When a patient gets a diagnosis of cancer everything starts to blur together and they don't have capacity to retain information given to them, especially when it's delivered all at once in a 30 minute appointment. 
  2. Providers aren't filtering information to make it relevant to a patient: Patients are given information about every type of breast cancer and because they are anxious and overwhelmed they don't remember what facts were specific to them. 
  3. Providers are afraid to give specifics in case it backfires on them so timing expectations are left vague: Providers gave broad statements stating that something could take multiple days or weeks for treatments, leaving patients unsure of the actual timeline for treatment. Many did not realize the surgery for breast reconstruction would take a full a year to complete.  
  4. Patient's areas where they needed to make a decision were not clear: Patients were not sure when they actually had a choice to make on their treatment or when they had to follow a doctor's order. 

“I didn’t know I could wait on my reconstruction options until later.” - Patient

Illustration from Cancer Vixen by Marisa Acocella Marchetto

Illustration from Cancer Vixen by Marisa Acocella Marchetto


Based on my interviews, observations and research I created an initial sitemap, wireframes and clickable prototype to gain feedback from cancer survivors and clinical team. I mentored my design intern in creating multiple UI designs. We conducted a heuristic usability test of our prototype, user tested with breast cancer survivors and conducted online usability testing. I identified a vendor to develop our app. I managed the requirements, tested releases and helped navigate how to get the app into iTunes. The app as synced to a provider dashboarder website that allowed all the doctors to see what a patient valued and the decisions they were considering. 

UI mock up with function call outs influenced by research

  Sitemap for patient facing decision app

Sitemap for patient facing decision app

  My first wireframes  -  Balsamiq

My first wireframes - Balsamiq

  My first wireframes - Balsamiq

My first wireframes - Balsamiq

  My first round of UI mockups - Illustrator

My first round of UI mockups - Illustrator

  Final designs done by Take the Wind

Final designs done by Take the Wind

Video of app pilot